neurotransmitters

Protect yourself from Electromagnetic Fields

Protect yourself from Electromagnetic Fields

Protect yourself from Electromagnetic Fields

Protect yourself from Electromagnetic Fields! Is this modern world of ours, modern technology is cool, amazing and improves our lives to some degree. However, there is a dark side to this technology because of all the electromagnetic fields that they emit.

It’s important to learn how to protect yourself from Electromagnetic Fields. You may think that there are no problems with these electromagnetic fields, but there is and there is research to prove it. These electromagnetic fields are affecting our immune systems, endocrine systems and even our cellular systems, especially the health of our mitochondria.

The following article is all about learning how to Protect yourself from Electromagnetic Fields. This article comes from EMF Warriors. Here is the link to the article on the EMF Warrior Website. Protect yourself from Electromagnetic Fields

You can also read the article below.

EMFs are everywhere but you can’t see, smell, hear, taste or touch them – the only way to determine if your home is safe for you and your children is to test. All EMF warriors who are serious about identifying nnEMFs in their environment have an EMF testing meter close at hand. To ensure you or your family are not being overexposed you need to test areas where you spend lots of time – your home, office and even your car. Testing is the most important thing you can do to protect yourself and your family. You can also hire testing equipment or engage a professional such as a building biologist to test your environment for you.

Common sources of nnEMFs in your home or office (excluding fake lights):

  • Bluetooth devices
  • Cordless phones
  • Computers and laptops
  • Digital alarm clocks
  • Electrical wiring
  • Microwave ovens
  • ‘Smart’ appliances
  • Smart meters
  • Smartphones and tablets
  • Solar panel invertors
  • TV screens
  • Wi-fi routers
  • Wireless modems
  • Wireless video game consoles
  • Wireless burglar alarms
  • Wireless baby monitors
  • Wireless printers

Some other hazards you might be exposed to that come from outside your home or office:

  • Telecommunication tower antennas and base stations
  • Radio and TV antennas
  • Electricity substations
  • High-voltage cables
  • Your neighbours’ smart meters.

The next step is to educate yourself. The best way is to join www.emfwarriors.com to access our free library and information on this website.

Here are some immediate actions everyone can take to improve their EMF hygiene

  1. Get into the habit of waking up and getting morning sun. Nothing beats the full spectrum rays coming from the sun. Expose your face and whole body if you can – about 30 minutes a day first thing around sunrise is optimal. If you can go to the beach to get the photons from the sun, electrons from the sand and minerals from the ocean. If you live away from the coast go for a bare foot walk in the park. No sunglasses.
  2. Determine if a smart meter has been installed in your meter box (usually without your permission or knowledge) If so ask your utility company to replace it.
  3. Replace all cordless phones in your home with wired versions – you could, alternatively, if you must buy a low-radiation DECT cordless phone to reduce the amount of nnEMFs travelling about.
  4. If you can’t use a landline to make a call use speaker mode on your smartphone holding the phone at least 30 cm away from your body. If you need privacy purchase a pair of air tube headsets.
  5. Use ethernet cables instead of wi-fi. Use an ethernet cable to connect all computers (includes baby monitors and tablets) to the internet, rather than a wireless router. Not everyone loves this option, as you can’t just stand up and walk around with your computer. But the extra benefit is that data transmission is much faster. Only turn on your wi-fi router when necessary, typically when visitors require access. Otherwise keep it unplugged from the electrical outlet.
  6. If you have to work with electronic devices at night, wear blue blocking glasses. (Some say you should also wear them during the day if you’re working indoors under artificial lights.) The glasses help reduces the intensity of the blue light getting into your eyes, and reduce the degree to which melatonin is suppressed in your system. You can also install f.lux on all computers; and you enable Night Shift mode on your iPhone if you have one.
  7. Build a sleep sanctuary and switch off everything in the bedroom or don’t have any devices in there to begin with. That means phones and tablets are turned off and in another room, no digital alarm clock or TV and all lights are off. Sleeping in total darkness promotes melatonin secretion in your body, and helps you rest and recover deeply.
  8. Most of all, whenever you can, take a break and get out in nature – get some sun, get some surf, and put your bare feet on the ground, whether that’s on weekends, on holidays or before work.

Outdoor Exercise improves your health

Outdoor Exercise

Hiking

Outdoor exercise is becoming more popular and for excellent reasons. Outdoor exercise brings healing and energy to all your bodies: physical, mental, emotional and spiritual. It also stimulates and enlivens all your senses: sight, hearing, smell, touch and even taste, if you bring some food, which is usually the case on long hikes, walks, or bike rides. 

Outdoor exercise brings balance to your hormones and neurotransmitters: Dopamine, Cortisol, Gaba, Melatonin, Norepinephrine, etc., and it releases endorphins, morphine-like chemicals produced by the body that help diminish pain while triggering positive feelings. They’re released from the pituitary gland of the brain during periods of exercise. Endorphins help relieve pain and induce feelings of pleasure or euphoria. YAY to outdoor exercise. 

The best outdoor exercise is whatever makes you feel the best. These days, there are many outdoor classes and activities: yoga, cross fit, boot camp, Tai Chi, hiking, walking, biking, snowboarding, skiing, snowshoeing cross country skiing, skate boarding, in-line skating, and more. 

There is also that sense of peace and connection to the divine when you are in the beauty of Mother Nature. To fully get into the healing powers of Mother Nature, the best outdoor exercises are hiking, snowshoeing and cross country skiing. With these three activities, you can really soak in the beauty of Mother Nature and in some respect, become a part of Mother Nature. 

On the whole, we have lost our way with the Earth and Mother Nature. By engaging in outdoor exercise, you can start to become more connected with the Earth and the healing powers of Mother Nature.

Here is a short video of my hike at Elk Meadow Park in Evergreen, Colorado.  

YAY to Hiking!

Mother Nature is healing!

Mother Nature is just outside waiting for you to embrace her healing benefits. Too many people have lost their way with connecting with Mother Nature. Getting outside and moving your body has many health benefits such as vitamin D production from the Sunlight, improved cardiovascular health, improved mental health and improved joint and muscle health. Spending time with Mother Nature triggers a good balance in various hormones and neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin and cortisol. When your hormones and neurotransmitters are in balance, you feel wonderful, in body and mind.

The following article goes into more detail about the benefits of spending time with Mother Nature. Here is the link to the article. Get Outdoors! Here is the link to the Author, Amy Whitley. 

Here is the full article about getting outside and spending time with Mother Nature.

The mental health benefits of exercise are well documented, known to reduce stress and increase “feel good” hormones like dopamine. But many of us seeking better mind-body heath overlook the benefits found in simply spending time outdoors. It turns out the age-old adage is correct: fresh air is good for you! While outdoor physical activities such as jogging, trail running, and hiking combine both physical exercise and the outdoors for a mental health boost jackpot, according to both the National Institutes of Health and Harvard Medical School, simply spending time in nature in any form can improve your mental outlook, in addition to providing physical benefits. How refreshing!

Ways in Which the Outdoors Boosts Mental Health

Getting outside and taking a stroll truly can clear your head while also boosting your immune system and elevating your sense of well-being. If you can get outdoors regularly, you can trade seasonal light therapy boxes and artificial indoor lighting for natural light, which floods your body with vitamin D and immediately improves your mood. Just 15 minutes of natural sunlight per day is known to reduce depression and anxiety levels. Perhaps even more importantly, vitamin D and all that natural sunlight helps you sleep better at night. A study out of the Saint Louis University School of Medicine noted that natural sunlight helps set our body’s internal clocks. And the better rested we are, the better our mood and mental state.

But stepping outside does more than offer sunshine. Studies show that those living in urban environments have to contend with sensory overload on a daily basis, causing what researchers call cognitive fatigue. Finding green space or stepping into a park or garden can give the brain a break from urban stimuli. A recent epidemiological study has shown that people who move to greener urban areas benefit from sustained improvements in their mental health, according to Frontiers in Psychology. In fact, a recent Scandinavian study found that office workers with even views of trees or nature had lower stress levels than those who had city views.

Nature improves concentration as well, helping both children with attention deficit disorders as well as elderly citizens combating dementia or Alzheimer’s. Without the rush of man-made stimuli, the human mind is freed up to be more creative, and having lower stress levels allows us to focus on the task at hand better. This is why you might get your best ideas during a day fishing on the lake, or make that breakthrough on a work-related problem while on a walk in the woods.

How to Make it Happen: Getting into Nature

Getting your daily dose of nature doesn’t have to involve traveling long distances or taking up extreme outdoor sports like backpacking or kayaking. While a daily walk or bike ride is ideal, any green space can boost your mood and lower your stress and anxiety levels. Even sitting outside on a patio or balcony can give you access to sunshine and, at the very least, a skylight over your work or living space can provide natural light. Consider walking or biking to work each day, taking a new route through a green space or park instead of along city streets, or opting for the scenic commute instead of the freeway.

While outdoor sports such as hiking, fishing, kayaking, and skiing successfully combine exercise with outdoor stimulation, any form of outdoor living will elevate your mental health. Simply walking through a forest has been proven to reduce levels of the stress hormone cortisol and reduce blood pressure and heart rate. So take a daily walk, try your hand at fishing, or simply sit and read in a garden to see benefits.

Attention Restoration Theory

Capitalizing on the restorative properties of peaceful outdoor settings doesn’t mean city life is all bad. Living in an urban environment is a happy reality for many who have chosen to live and work in urban centers, and has many upsides. This is where Attention Restoration Theory (ART) comes in.

The thinking behind ART is that urban settings can have an excess of stimuli (car horns, sirens, people) that demand our attention whether we are consciously paying attention to them or not, whereas natural settings require our attention but also reward us with feelings of pleasure and help restore our attention. For urban dwellers, visiting a setting such as a park can feel like an oasis, in that it provides the feeling of “getting away” even though you may only be minutes away from your office.

Getting outdoors to feel happier and healthier is both intuitive and backed by medical science! Make yourself a promise to spend just 15 minutes or more in a natural environment per day to reap the rewards.

Energy!

Would you like more energy? Would you like to wake up refreshed and have all the energy needed to achieve what you need and want to do for the day? Of course, you do! Why are most people struggling with a lack of energy and vitality?

Stress is probably the biggest factor in zapping your energy. Modern society is stressful. Too much stress can raise cortisol levels, which causes a host of issues, such as weight gain, insomnia, high blood sugar and a compromised immune system. Too much stress can put you in the sympathetic nervous system, which puts your body and mind in a heightened alert state, known as the flight or fight response. This can cause the production of too much of the excitatory neurotransmitters and hormones such as Dopamine, Epinephrine, and Norepinephrine; leading to increased heart rate and blood pressure and poor digestion. Over time, this can lead to what is known as “Tired, but Wired.” After the Tired but Wired state has run its course, major fatigue will set in as the majority of your hormones and neurotransmitters will be in a very low productive state and your energy will be zapped. 

The big key to stress management is to find that proper balance for yourself.  We need some stress in our lives in order to reach goals and to continue to learn and move forward in life. What we don’t need is chronic stress that brings us down and our energy down. Chronic stress consists of the following: unhealthy relationships and jobs, unhealthy eating, lack of or too much exercise, lack of connections and friendships, working too much, lack of sleep and too much blue light after the sun sets.

The goal to sustained energy is to have the proper balance in being in your parasympathetic nervous and in your sympathetic nervous system. This balance will bring about a balance in hormone and neurotransmitter production. The calming and good feel effect of GABA, Serotonin and Endorphins will be in proper balance and the focus and energizing effect of Dopamine, Epinephrine, and Norepinephrine will be in proper balance. Cortisol will also be in proper balance and your weight, blood pressure, blood sugar and immune response will be humming along happily. 

Here is a list of the best things to do to ensure heathy energy levels.

  1. Eat a high fat, cholesterol rich diet with moderate protein and moderate to low carbohydrates.
  2. Meditate every day for 10-30 minutes. Focus on relaxing your body and mind and breath deeply.
  3. Do some strength training such as weight lifting, body weight exercises or yoga.
  4. Do some interval training such as sprint for 30 seconds, rest for 90 seconds, and repeat for a total of 15-20 minutes.
  5. Do not over do the cardio workouts. Concentrate on walking 3-4 miles or running at a slow to moderate pace for 2-3 miles. Monitor how you feel after exercising. You should feel slightly energized. If not, reduce that type of exercise or stop doing it. 
  6. Sleep for 8-9 hours a night and sleep in a dark room. Wear a sleep mask if needed. 
  7. Get off the computer and cell phone and stop watching TV, at least on hour before bed. If you are unable to do this, buy some blue light blocking glasses. 
  8. Express yourself emotionally and set safe boundaries for yourself. This may take some time, but it’s worth it. 
  9. Find an activity that brings you joy such as dancing, hiking, singing, writing, painting, poetry, frisbee golf, stand up paddle boarding, etc. 
  10. Strive to eat when you are actually hungry and stop when you are full. The key is to get into the rhythm of hunger and satiety. Overeating zaps your energy, while following the signs of hunger and satiety boosts your energy.
  11. Strive to Let Go of everything you cannot control.
  12. Laugh as laughter is good medicine